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Thursday, July 15, 2010     INTELLIGENCE BRIEFING

Plan calls for NATO troops to 'overcome Israel's security objections to a Palestinian state'

RAMALLAH — The Palestinian Authority has requested that NATO send troops to secure any new Palestinian state in the West Bank.

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Officials said PA Chairman Mahmoud Abbas has relayed a proposal for the stationing of NATO troops along the borders of any Palestinian state in the West Bank. They said the proposal was drafted in cooperation with U.S. envoy George Mitchell, assigned to accelerate efforts to win Israeli agreement for the establishment of a Palestinian state by 2012.

"The deployment of NATO forces is meant to overcome Israel's security objections to a Palestinian state," an official said.


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Officials said Abbas submitted the plan to Mitchell in July amid indirect talks between Israel and the PA. They said the United States has been pressing the PA to move to direct negotiations with Israel based on a plan for a Palestinian state over the next two years.

Mohammed Dahlan, a key aide of Abbas and member of the Fatah Central Committee, said the PA plan called for the deployment of NATO troops between the West Bank and neighboring Jordan. He said NATO forces would also be stationed in other areas of the West Bank deemed as lacking sufficient security.

In a briefing on July 13, Dahlan said the PA plan also called for a Palestinian state in the entire West Bank with the option of land swaps with Israel. He said the plan has also been submitted to Israel, which has not yet responded.

"Mitchell is expected ask the PA to go to direct negotiations with a package that would overcome obstacles to a full agreement," Dahlan said.

At this point, Dahlan said, Fatah would not agree to direct talks with Israel unless it submitted to PA demands on the borders of a Palestinian state and the freezing of Jewish construction in the West Bank and most of Jerusalem. He said Israel must accept the principle of a Palestinian state in the entire West Bank as well as eastern Jerusalem.

Officials said Israel has insisted on its right to patrol the air space over any Palestinian state as well as the pursuit of insurgents who conduct attacks from the West Bank. They said Israel has also expressed reservations to the establishment of a separate Fatah-controlled state in the West Bank while Hamas controls the Gaza Strip.




Comments


I just hope that those NATO troops are just as effective as Unifil in Lebanon in making sure that no weapons arrive in the murderous hands of Hizbullah.

Rick      7:13 p.m. / Friday, July 16, 2010


Nation.com:

    The most extensive violator of Security Council resolutions is Israel. A survey of the nearly 1,500 resolutions passed by the Security Council (..) reveals more than ninety resolutions currently violated by countries other than Iraq. The vast majority of these violations are by governments closely allied to the United States. Moroccan forces still occupy Western Sahara. Meanwhile, Turkey remains in violation of Security Council Resolution 353 and more than a score of resolutions calling for its withdrawal from northern Cyprus, which Turkey, a NATO ally, invaded in 1974.

    Israel's refusal to respond positively to the formal acceptance this past March by the Arab League of the land-for-peace formula put forward in Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338 arguably puts Israel in violation of these resolutions, long seen as the basis for Middle East peace. More clearly, Israel has defied Resolutions 267, 271 and 298, which demand that it rescind its annexation of greater East Jerusalem, as well as dozens of other resolutions insisting that Israel cease its violations of the Fourth Geneva Convention.

http://www.thenation.com/article/us-double-standards

luc      3:25 p.m. / Friday, July 16, 2010

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